Austrade provides information, advice and a number of business services to help Australian businesses reduce the time, costs and risks associated with exporting. Relations between Australia and Sweden are strong, particularly in the areas of trade and educational services. In 2007, two-way trade in goods between the two countries amounted to AUD 2.6 billion. [1] According to the Swedish Trade Council, Australia`s total exports to Sweden increased by more than 27% in 2008 to around AUD 445 million, while Australian imports from Sweden increased by more than 7.5% to around AUD 2.5 billion. More than 150 Swedish companies have an Australian subsidiary. [2] The two countries have also concluded a double taxation convention as well as a bilateral Holiday Maker labour agreement. [3] Contains background information, recent economic indicators, Australia`s trade and investment relationship with Sweden and its overall trade relations on goods, which are updated twice a year. As the fourth largest export market outside Europe, Australia is an important trading partner for Sweden. Today, more than 150 Swedish companies are present in the country and about 500 others do business through local partners. In 2018, total Swedish exports to Australia exceeded 17.4 billion Swedish kronor.

Swedish companies have a good reputation and are renowned for providing a high level of quality. As noted below in the interview with Martin Ekberg, Commissioner of Trade & Invest, the Australian economy continues to offer many opportunities for Swedish companies, despite the geographical distance between the two countries. Martin Ekberg said there are six major changes we are now seeing in the Australian business landscape, which have been accelerated because of Covid-19. Some are already underway before Covid-19, but some have increased and are; the modernisation of Australia`s defence capabilities, the rapid pursuit of important infrastructure and the focus on improving the competitiveness of local production. Other non-sectoral changes, such as the introduction of emission reduction technology, the introduction of digitalisation and cybersecurity, but also the growing desire to diversify Australia`s commercial presence vis-à-vis trading partners, are also recognised changes. “Covid-19 as well as the trade conflict between the US and China have exposed Australia`s trade vulnerability,” said Martin Ekberg. . . .

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